Top 5 British Comedy Television Shows of All Time

If you are someone who enjoys comedy and laughter, then you will most likely be familiar with all the different comedy TV shows in the UK. There have been many brilliant comedy shows over the years that have given the UK population a good laugh; comedy television shows could include sketch shows, television series, and stand up comedy acts, but there are many that we have come to know and love as a nation. If you are interested in binge-watching these comedy TV series, but your aerial is a little worse for wear, then you may need the services of a TV Aerial Installation Cardiff based company such as https://www.onevisionltd.co.uk/tv-aerial-installation-cardiff, or an aerial installation company near you who can fix your current aerial or provide you with a new one. Here are the top 5 British Comedy Television Shows of all Time.

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Only Fools and Horses

Inside Nelson Mandela House in Peckham lives the Trotter brothers, Del Boy and Rodney, and not forgetting ‘Grandad’; this comedy show highlights the struggle that Del Boy, Rodney, and Grandad go through to make ends meet. The brothers work as store traders at ‘Trotters Independent Trading Company’, and with Del Boys ‘wheeling and dealing’ personality, and Rodney’s computer skills, they are able to make enough money to pay for their rent and to support themselves and Grandad. There are many funny moments in the show, usually stemming from Del Boy’s desperation to make a little extra cash. Later on, in the show, Grandad sadly passes away, and that is when they are met by Grandad’s brother, Uncle Allbert, who ends up moving in with them. Over time they become tired and annoyed with Uncle Albert always telling stories from his time in the war, but they come to love him nonetheless.

The Vicar of Dibley

The Vicar of Dibley is a comedy show that stars Dawn French as a young female Vicar that is transferred into the small village of Dibley. The former Vicar passes away, so the village is then assigned a new Vicar, and to the local’s surprise, it is a female Vicar; this was during the time when women were just being welcomed to become Vicars in the Church of England. This show features many funny moments involving the Vicar and its village locals; the characters represent those who live in small rural villages, such as Alice Tinker, a lady that is known to be a tad ditsy and almost childlike, and Letitia Cropley who likes to knit and create bad food combinations.

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Fawlty Towers

This television series features well-known stars, John Cleese and Prunella Scales; this comedy show is based in a hotel in Torquay. There were many hilarious moments on the show, many of which were at the expense of Basil Fawlty, the hotel owner, who is short-tempered and not good with people. He regularly gets himself into bad situations which makes the show much funnier. His wife Sybil is better in social situations and is usually the one to get Basil out of his predicaments. This show ran from 1975 to 1979, with just a total of 12 episodes.

Keeping Up Appearances

This comedy series focuses on an old couple, Hyacinth Bucket and Richard Bucket who live in an upper-class street in Coventry. Hyacinth Bucket grew up in a working-class home, but now likes to think she is posh and upper class; she desperately tries not to be seen in public with her working-class family who lives in a council estate. This show has produced many laughs, many of those at Hyacinth’s expense as she desperately tries to convince everyone that she is posh. She is highly strung and extremely loud – something her husband Richard finds very annoying.

Black Adder

Black Adder is a comedy television series that is set in different past times, for example, the first series is set during the middle ages, whilst the second series is set during the reign of Queen Elizabeth l. The most notable series was Black Adder goes forth, and this is set during the First World War. The main characters include Edmund Black Adder (Rowan Atkinson), Lieutenant George (Hugh Laurie), and Private Baldrick (Tony Robinson), and they are based in the war trenches. Many funny moments come from a sarcastic and dry humored Black Adder, and the bumbling fools George and Baldrick. Many hilarious scenes include those of General Melchett (Stephen Fry) and Captian Darling (Tim McInnerny) who like to come and disrupt the peace in the trenches.

What is the ‘Great Deku Tree’ and Why is it a Key Character in The Legend of Zelda?

If you have played the Legend of Zelda game series, you will know that the ‘Great Deku Tree’ is a popular recurring character in the games. The Legend of Zelda is a fantasy game that includes action, adventure and plenty of sword fights. The main character in the game series is Link, and he is always on a quest, but another important character in many of the Legend of Zelda games is the Great Deku Tree, and he is located in the Korok Forest; throughout certain Legend of Zelda games, the Great Deku Tree plays an important part in the story. You can play Legend of Zelda on a range of Nintendo consoles, why not check out Nintendo’s other popular games?

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The Great Deku Tree first appeared in ‘The Legend of Zelda – Ocarina of Time’, where he has a curse put on him by the Gerudo – King of Thieves; Link then goes on a quest to lift the curse from the Great Deku Tree, but despite Links brave efforts to help him, he could not be saved and sadly perished. He then appeared in the next game ‘The Wind Waker’, where he begins to grow back as a tree sprout, but he is unfortunately under attack from the small enemies – the ‘ChuChus’. He then appears again in the game ‘Breath of the Wild’, where he presents Link with ‘The Guardian Sword’ to defeat Calamity Ganon, an evil force that has taken over Hyrule, and the surrounding area. Link defeats the evil force Calamity Ganon and brings peace to Hyrule and the other areas around it.

The Great Deku Tree is a key character in ‘The Legend of Zelda’ because he is the guardian of the Korok forest, and the lands surrounding him; he is responsible for looking after the small creatures in the forest, such as the Koroki, as he is the source of life in the Korok Forest. Not all trees are like the Great Deku Tree though, so if you have one unruly tree in your garden, you may want to get rid of it; this is something you will not want to do on your own, as cutting a tree down safely and correctly takes great skill. There are many Tree Surgeon Bournemouth based companies, or ones nearer to you who can help with cutting your tree down and creating more space in your garden. Legend of Zelda continues to be a popular video game with many gaming enthusiasts, and continue to bring out new games that show the adventures of Link and the Great Deku Tree.

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When it was announced that there would be a whole new set of channels coming onto the Television the country rejoiced! They would be getting the choice of 2 channels instead of just 1. Arguments about what to watch were soon going to be raging in British homes as the public got the choice of this or that. Whatever the decision there had to be a decent signal receiver on the roof and the Ariel was the only answer. This is still true today in our digital world and a TV Aerial Installation Cheltenham based organization like http://steveunettaerials.co.uk/services/tv-aerials-repair-and-installation-cheltenham/ can provide the service you need.

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The BBC had been putting out programs since 1935 even when hardly anyone had a television. By 1955 the rates of ownership had gone up thanks to the televised Coronation of Elizbeth II, cheaper imports and the chance to rent rather than buy. After 20 years of monopoly the Government thought it would be a good idea to force the complacent BBC into trying a bit harder by introducing free to view competition in the shape of Independent Television or ITV, although you still had to pay for a TV license so, in effect, you paid twice if you bought something advertised on TV. The BBC was determined to scupper the opening night so and they decided the only way they could do that was by killing off poor Grace Archer in a Barn fire, the effect of which Ambridge is still trying to recover from today.

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The idea behind ITV is that it would provide Regional programming. Lots of different companies sprang up and put in tenders to control the output and produce and area programs. They would make and by programs put out by their fellow independent channels and then act like the BBC did not exist. For there part, the BBC did the same.

One thing that came out of ITV was a sense that they needed to identify themselves. All the BBC needed to do was have a man in a Dinnerjack say in the plummy voice “This is the BBC…” and you knew what you were watching. ITV came up with lots of different ones. Some, like Anglia Television, featured an Airfix model of a Knight on a turntable and the words Anglia on the flag. London Weekend Television had examples of the London skyline reflected in the Thames. Central just had a big white circle. All of them had a short burst of music and depending on what came on you were able to gauge the quality of the program.

Whatever the output ITV was here to stay.

The bronze bust of a musical visionary

If you were ever inclined to make an award for the best position of where a bronze bust was placed then surely the one of Sir Henry Wood would be a front runner. Wood, along with the concert impresario Robert Newman, made the “The Proms” what they are today and brought classical music and it’s appreciation into the twentieth century and beyond. It is perfectly fitting then that his Bronze bust sits in front of the organ of the Royal Albert Hall so that he can “hear” the glory of the Proms and the other concerts that occur there. A Bronze piece of art is a great investment to have and there are many great examples of the work such as a Horse Sculpture. A visit to www.gillparker.com/will gives you plenty of ideas and inspiration.

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Sir Henry was not born into a rich family, in fact, they were of quite modest means his Father being a small jeweler and optician and prior to that a pawnbroker. However, the senior Woods were keen musicians, his Father could play the cello and sang tenor for the local operatic society and his mother was a pianist and singer too. The young Wood was regaled with Welsh native songs by her and when they saw that there Son was gifted musically they actively encouraged him to pursue it. With the considerable purchase of a piano that he was taught to play by his, Mother Wood was also given lessons in the playing of both the Violin and the Viola.

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His first gig was playing the organ at St Mary Aldermanbury where he was paid half a crown (about 75p) to entertain the congregation. Ironically it was not the only place he played in that was subsequently destroyed by the Blitz of the Second World War. He was also asked to play in an exhibition in Kensington and after school, he attended the Royal Academy of Music studying the art of singing. He was not a success and was told he had a “conductor’s voice” so decide to teach it instead on his departure.

He found a love of opera and was a huge fan of Gilbert and Sullivan who were combining the art of the operatic style with the drama and comedy of the stage to reinvent it. He started to conduct for companies and got his first big break conducting Tchaikovsky’s work but the run fell through and it seemed that singing lessons would be his lot.

However, Robert Newman asked him to front a season of Promenade music he was planning over the summer months with a view to making it an annual fixture. The easy-going nature of the Proms appealed to Wood and he accepted.  Together they built the Proms up to the level it is today albeit weathering two world wars, the bombing of the Proms “home” the Queens Hall and a move to the Royal Albert Hall and Newman’s bankruptcy.